Tag Archives: moon

The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine (Anymore) – Maybe. Polar Exploration and the Mysterious Novaya Zemlya Effect

Sun's image distorted and elongated by atmospheric refraction ©Tim Jones
Sun’s image distorted and elongated by atmospheric refraction ©Tim Jones

A Polar Phenomenon

In May 1915, as Ernest Shackleton and the crew of Endurance entered their fourth month trapped in ice on the Antarctic’s Weddell Sea, the ship’s navigator added to the gloom by declaring the Sun would be absent from the sky for the next seventy days.   You expect this at above 75° South; but then on the 8th of May something strange happened.  The Sun reappeared – several times:

The sun, which had made “positively his last appearance” seven days earlier, surprised us by lifting more than half its disk above the horizon on May 8.  A glow on the northern horizon resolved itself into the sun at 11 a.m. that day.  A quarter of an hour later the unseasonable visitor disappeared again, only to rise again at 11.40 a.m., set at 1 p.m., rise at 1.10 p.m.. and set lingeringly at 1.20 p.m.

Ernest Shackleton, 19151

 

Shackleton understood the effects of atmospheric refraction, that temperature and density differences can bend light – especially near the horizon.   At sunrise and sunset the disk of the Sun can appear distorted: lengthened or flattened, or displaced from its true position in the sky – where Newton put it.

Endurance in Weddell Sea
Ernest Shackleton made his observations from the Endurance while frozen in the Weddell Sea (the bay top left)

Mariners knew about the phenomenon, and referenced standard refraction tables to correct sextant readings in navigation; but the system broke down below about 6 degrees, where refraction increased rapidly and non-linearly.

How atmospheric refraction can make the Sun visible when it's still below the horizon ©Tim Jones
How atmospheric refraction can make the Sun visible when it’s still below the horizon ©Tim Jones

In this case, as Shackleton recorded in his journal, the Sun was 2 degrees and 37 minutes (2°37′) from its true position, 2 degrees more than any refraction table prediction.  Plotting position from this observation would place the Endurance 120 miles from its actual location.

What Shackleton experienced was an extreme case of atmospheric refraction known as the Novaya Zemlya effect, first reported in 1597 by Gerrit De Veer2 , one of the crew on Willem Barent’s third voyage to discover a north-east passage.  Obliged to hunker down for the polar winter in a safety hut or ‘Het Behouden Huijs‘ built on the Novaya Zemlya island chain north of Russia, De Veer reported the return of the post-winter Sun a whole two weeks before it should have been visible; it was in fact 5°26’ below the horizon.  The same thing happened two days later, the Sun still, by the book,  4° below the horizon.

Novaya Zemlya
Map depicting Willem Barents three voyages to discover a North East Passage, showing the Novaya Zemlya islands (Wikipedia)

novaya1The Novaya Zemlya effect occurs in Arctic regions where tracts of cold air remain uniquely stable over hundreds of kilometers, creating a special instance of a  meteorological temperature inversion.  The distortion, powerful enough to bend light through four or five degrees, can make celestial bodies like the Sun or Moon appear wholly above the horizon when they are physically below it.  (If you imagine looking at the horizon, five degrees is the same as ten Suns or Moons in a row.)

For hundreds of years, Gerrit De Veer’s solar observations, and equally his report of a curiously displaced conjunction of the Moon and Jupiter, were not believed.  They said he must have counted the days wrong, or used the wrong sort of calendar.  It took the corroborating reports of polar explorers like Shackleton and, as recently as 2003, ray-tracing simulations3 using contemporary atmospheric data, to vindicate De Veer fully.

Modern almanacs still include refraction tables. (HM Nautical ALmanac Office)
Modern almanacs still include refraction tables. (HM Nautical ALmanac Office)

 

Time Travel with Starry Night

I’ve set up my own simulations of the celestial events reported by Shackleton and De Veer using the planetarium software Starry Night.  The program can’t reproduce the ray traced refraction effects modeled by van der Werf et al3 – whose validity I’m not equipped to comment on by the way, but it’s still satisfying to check the published numbers and get a feel for what the events looked like all those years ago.

 

 

 

 

Shackleton’s Solar Observation

First up, the view from the Endurance in 1915:

View from Weddell Sea (Lat. 75 degree 23 mins S Long. 42 degree 14 mins W) 8th May, 1915, 1:20pm (UT) ©Tim Jones, Starry Night Software
View from Weddell Sea (Lat. 75 degree 23 mins S Long. 42 degree 14 mins W) 8th May, 1915, 1:20pm (UT) ©Tim Jones, Starry Night Software

The horizon terrain here is generic Starry Night; apart from being icy-white, the true horizon would run perpendicular to and cross the graduated white Meridian line at zero (0) degrees.  The green line is the Ecliptic.  Things are clearer for our purposes, if less romantic, if we turn off the daylight effect and fancy terrain and zoom in a bit.  It’s now clear the Sun was below the horizon when Shackleton reported seeing it: i.e. with reference to the Meridian on the left, the Sun looks about two and half degrees below the zero degree mark (Shackleton’s 2°37′):

shackleton-120
View from Weddell Sea (Lat. 75 degree 23 mins S Long. 42 degree 14 mins W) 8th May, 1915, 1:20pm (UT). With generic landscape and daylight effect turned off ©Tim Jones, Starry Night Software

 

Gerrit De Veer’s Solar Observation

Willem Barent’s crew, marooned 300 years earlier at the opposite end of the planet, made their observations from the ‘Behouden Huijs‘ at coördinates 76° 15.4′ North 68°18.6’ East, Novaya Zemlya.  This view from the Huijs at 7 o’clock on the morning of 24th January 1597, shows the Sun was firmly below the horizon when Gerrit De Veer observed it – a whole 5°26′ below (horizon is perpendicular to the zero mark on the white Meridian line, green line is the Ecliptic):

Gerritt De Veer sunrise
View from the rescue hut on (Lat. 76 degree 15.4 mins N Long. 68 degree 18.6 mins W) 24th Jan, 1597, 7:00 am (UT). ©Tim Jones, Starry Night Software

 

Gerrit De Veer’s Moon-Jupiter Conjunction

The Moon-Jupiter conjunction reported by De Veer physically happened at 0:14 UT on 25th January 1597 (there is a small error in the 0:24 UT time given in the contemporary tables by Scala that De Veer used).   Like astronomers today, De Veer identified the moment of conjunction as the time when a line drawn along the shadow separating light from dark on the moon’s surface, the terminator, pointed directly at Jupiter, as in this photograph I took of the Moon-Jupiter conjunction of 21 January 2012:

Moon and Jupiter, 18:45, 21.01.2012, Los Angeles ©Tim Jones
Moon and Jupiter, 18:45, 21.01.2012, Los Angeles ©Tim Jones

 This is the Starry Night simulation of the De Veer conjunction:

De Veer's moon jupiter conjunction
Moon-Jupiter conjunction, 0:14 (UT) 25th Jan,1597. Location: the rescue hut on (Lat. 76 degree 15.4 mins N Long. 68 degree 18.6 mins W) ©Tim Jones, Starry Night Software

The Moon is barely above the horizon and Jupiter is below it (again, reference the zero on the white Meridian line).

Gerrit De Veer saw this view, but over an hour after it happened: i.e. at 01:27 UT not 00:14 UT.  As van der Werf’s analysis explains, De Veer reported the conjunction at 6 a.m. local time, which was 4:33 hours ahead of UT.  Such was the unbelievable power of the Novaya Zemlya effect to make this happen that few indeed believed it.   De Veer learned about the conjunction from his copy of the Ephemerides of Josephus Scala which gave times for Venice.  Here we pick up the story in De Veer’s own words and the spellings of his 1609 translator William Phillip:

Whereupon we sought to knowe when the same coniunction should be ouer or about the house where we then were; and at last we found, yt the 24 day January was the same day whereon the coniunction aforesaid happened in Venice, at one of the clocke in the night [= 1 in the morning of 25th Jan], and with vs in the morning when ye sun was in the east: for we saw manifestly that the two planets aforesaid approached neere vnto each other, vntill such time as the moone and Jupiter stood ouer the other, both in the sign of Taurus, and that was at six of the clocke in the morning;at which time the moone and Jupiter were found by our compas to be in coniunction, ouer our house..
Gerrit De Veer 1597

Yet ray tracing the scenario 400 years later, with Jupiter two degrees below the horizon and the Moon just above it at  conjunction, shows that atmospheric conditions raised Jupiter’s apparent position disproportionately to that of the Moon.  Moreover, the simulation reproduced what De Veer saw at the time he saw it: a conjunction visible to him at around 02:00 UT.  The ray tracing team made a further minor adjustment for the Equation of Time effect, which brought their estimate of when the conjunction was visible to De Veer as 06:20 local time, which is impressively close to his 06:00.)

Apparent position of Jupiter and the Moon after allowing for atmospheric refraction. Diagram reproduced from analysis by van der Werf et al, 2003 (reference 2)
Apparent position of Jupiter and the Moon after allowing for atmospheric refraction. Moon is double actual size for clarity. Diagram reproduced from analysis by van der Werf et al, 2003 (reference 3)

One More Thing

Although Gerrit De Veer’s vindication now seems complete, there was one little alarm bell went off during my research, and that concerns De Veer’s reference to both the Moon and Jupiter being in the constellation of Taurus at the time of conjunction.  Zooming in to see the 1597 conjunction against modern constellation boundaries puts it well into Aries.  So what gives?

constell
Modern constellation boundaries. Moon-Jupiter conjunction, 0:14 (UT) 25th Jan,1597. Location: the rescue hut on (Lat. 76 degree 15.4 mins N Long. 68 degree 18.6 mins W) ©Tim Jones, Starry Night Software

Maybe the constellation boundaries have changed; let’s have a look at Albrecht Dürer’s beautiful star chart from 1515.  The belly of the bull tucks a little further under the ram than in modern charts, but the conjunction is still firmly in Aries. 

Star chart of the northern skies, Albrecht Dürer, 1515, Nuremberg.
Star chart of the northern skies, Albrecht Dürer, 1515, Nuremberg.

Maybe the Moon made the stars in Aries harder to see that night, so instead De Veer focused on the sparkling Pleiades and Hyades clusters in Taurus; I’d probably do that if I were standing in a freezing Arctic wasteland staring at the sky at six in the morning.  I later discovered Charles Beke4 in a 19th century analysis of the William Phillip translation also noticed the discrepancy.  He points out a retrogression of the equinoctial points – the places where the celestial equator intersects the ecliptic – has since De Veer’s day shifted the positions of the constellations in terms of longitude and latitude relative to those references; but that rather suggests in his write-up De Verre placed the conjunction in whatever constellation the numbers dictated, rather than where he saw it?  Still a bit of a mystery to solve then – at least in my mind.  

References

  1. E. Shackleton, South: The Story of Shackleton’s Last Expedition 1914–1917, MacMillan, New York, 1920
  2. Gerrit De Veer, The Three Voyages of William Barents to the Arctic Regions (1594, 1595 and 1596). London, 1876 (translation of 1609 original).
  3. Gerrit de Veer’s True and Perfect Description of the Novaya Zemlya Effect, 24-27 January 1597, Siebren Y. van der Werf, Günther P. Können, Waldemar H. Lehn, Frits Steenhuisen, and Wayne P. S. Davidson; Applied Optics, Vol. 42, Issue 3, pp. 379-389 (2003)http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.42.000379
  4. Charles T. Beke, The Three Voyages of Willem Barents to the Arctic Regions 1594, 1595 and 1596 by Gerrit de Veer, 2nd ed.William Phillip, trans., Hakluyt Society, London, 1876 (Page 147)

 

Jupiter Conjunction with the Moon 21st January 2013

Jupiter this afternoon is moving in for the closest line-of-sight conjunction with the moon you’ll see until the year 2026.

Moon with Jupiter in daylight. 15.30 (PST) from Los Angeles. © Tim Jones
Moon with Jupiter in daylight. 15.30 (PST) from Los Angeles. © Tim Jones

Jupiter is very bright and easily viewable in the daytime – especially with binoculars; the problem is you can never find it.   Because it’s so close to the moon today, that’s no problem: find the moon and you’ve found Jupiter.  This is my first pic of the day.  I’ll update with new ones every few hours as Jupiter moves in to closest approach and the Jovian satellites start to appear.   I have only a reasonable telephoto with me, not a telescope, but we’ll see how it goes.

Get out there now with those binocs!

Moon with Jupiter in Daylight 16:30 (PST) Los Angeles ©Tim Jones
Moon with Jupiter in Daylight 16:30 (PST), 21.01.2013, Los Angeles ©Tim Jones
Moon with Jupiter 17:00 (PST) Los Angeles
Moon with Jupiter 17:00 (PST), 21.01.2013, Los Angeles ©Tim Jones
IMG_0499_2
Jupiter and Moon, 17:25 (PST) Los Angeles, ©Tim Jones
Jupiter and Moon, 17:45 (PST) Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Jupiter and Moon, 17:45 (PST) Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Jupiter and Moon, 17:55 (PST), 21.01.2013, Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Jupiter and Moon, 17:55 (PST), Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Jupiter & Jovian Moons, 17:55 (PST) ©Tim Jones
Jupiter & Jovian Moons, 17:55 (PST), 21.01.2013, Los Angeles, ©Tim Jones
Jupiter and Moon, 18:41 (PST) Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Jupiter and Moon, 18:41 (PST), 21.01.2013, Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Moon and Jupiter, 18:45, 21.01.2013, Los Angeles ©Tim Jones
Moon and Jupiter, 18:45, 21.01.2013, Los Angeles ©Tim Jones
Moon, Jupiter, Hyades & Pleiades clusters 18:49 (PST), 21.01.2013, Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Moon, Jupiter, Hyades & Pleiades clusters 18:49 (PST) Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
You don't need the Hubble Space Telescope to have fun with the sky...
You don’t need the Hubble Space Telescope to have fun with the sky…
Moon and Jupiter, 19:21 (PST), Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Moon and Jupiter, 19:21 (PST), Los Angeles. ©Tim Jones
Position of Jovian moons 19:45 (PST) Starry Night software
Position of Jovian moons 19:45 (PST) Starry Night software (note: this just to show moon positions; the image of Jupiter here is from the software; my kit isn’t that good).
Jupiter and Moon, with the fairy-lights on and Orion rising. What more could you want?
Jupiter and Moon, with the fairy-lights on and Orion rising. What more could you want?

That’s about as close as it will get: 30 minutes of arc, or a Moon’s diameter.  Some folks in the Southern Hemisphere will see Jupiter completely disappear behind the moon – an occultation.  But that’s me done for the evening.  Happy stargazing!

Total Lunar Eclipse 10th December 2011

Lunar Eclipse, 10th December 2011, 5.40 PST from Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th December 2011, 5.40 PST from Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)

I took these photographs between 5.00 and 6.15 a.m., 10th December 2011, from the foothills above Los Angeles near Pasadena. Here’s the progression through to totality at around 6.05 a.m.

  Pics taken on Canon 7D, 100-400 L, Various ISO 200-800, 100th" - 1" f6.3
Pics taken on Canon 7D, 100-400 L, Various ISO 200-800, 100th" - 1" f6.3
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.15 PST Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.15 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.24 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.24 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.33 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.33 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.35 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.35 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.39 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.39 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.40 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.40 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.50 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.50 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.50 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10 Dec. 2011, 5.50 PST, Los Angeles, Photo:Tim Jones
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 5.55 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 5.55 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.00 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.00 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.02 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.02 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.04 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.04 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)

 

Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.04 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.04 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.08 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.08 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.11 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.11 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.11 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)
Lunar Eclipse, 10th Dec 2011, 6.11 PST, Los Angeles (Photo:Tim Jones)

 

Armchair Astrophotography

It’s a good few years since I took a photograph through a telescope, so I thought I’d share my latest pics.

Moon. ETX-90 prime focus, Canon 7D
Moon. ETX-90 prime focus, Canon 7D

The moon’s been presenting itself as a nice late evening target in our Westerly outlook this week, so that’s where I’m starting. These two are the best of the bunch from the last couple of nights (click for bigger pictures):

Moon, ETX-90, Canon 7D eyepiece projection (12.5mm ortho)

And in this video clip taken by eyepiece projection, there’s quite a bit of detail visible in the Mare Criseum (Sea-of-Crises) at top left:

[quicktime]https://communicatescience.com/zoonomian/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Moon_astro_7_4_11_eyepieceprojection2.m4v[/quicktime]

This longer clip shows a complete traverse of the moon across the field of view (no tracking):

[quicktime]https://communicatescience.com/zoonomian/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Moon_astro_7_4_11.m4v[/quicktime]

I’m particularly pleased with how the videos came out, capturing the fleeting moments of still air you need to look out for when observing live by eye.

The rig is built around an ultra-compact Meade ETX-90 telescope, picked up when I moved to London 10 years ago as a more suitable replacement for my 6 inch reflector.  All I’ve added is a connecting tube and T-mount to get the camera hitched up.

ETX-90 set up for astrophotographyETX-90 set up for astrophotography

My six inch reflector of yesteryear

Strictly speaking, you don’t need a telescope for astrophotography.  Here’s the Plough (Big Dipper) taken with a tripod-mounted standard lens:

Plough (Big Dipper) with standard lens

And these shots of an Earthlit  Moon and Venus are two of my favourites:

Moon and VenusMoon with EarthlightI’ve also had some luck in the middle ground using telephoto lenses, where the results have been surprisingly good: like these pics of a lunar eclipse, the International Space Station (ISS), and Jupiter with its moons; all taken with a 400mm lens – in the case of the ISS, hand-held:

Lunar Eclipse, 400mm lens, Canon 7D
International Space Station (ISS) and Jupiter
ISS with Jupiter through 400mm telephoto and digitally zoomed

International Space Station

 

 

18 megapixels of digital zoom  helps resolve the ISS into something other than an unrecognisable blob.

Jupiter with moons, 400mm lens on Canon 7D
Jupiter with moons, 400mm lens on Canon 7D
Jupiter with moons, 400mm lens on Canon 7D
Jupiter. Taken holding camera to lens of a spotting (birding) scope.
Jupiter. Taken holding camera to lens of a spotting (birding) scope.

But to resolve surface detail in objects like Jupiter, a true  astronomical telescope is called for.

Moon taken with smartphone through ETX-90
Smartphone held to eyepiece

I started by simply holding my smartphone to the eyepiece. Not a disaster, but I lost fine detail and the moon took on a weird pinkish bloom.

logitech webcam with lens removed
Webcam attached to telescope
Logitech webcam with lens removed
Webcam CCDs are very small

Attaching a digital SLR directly to the telescope gave better results, with the camera’s CCD (Charge Coupled Device) sensor at the prime focus.  I also experimented with an old Logitech webcam with the lens removed, but the background noise was too high and the small sensor size made for a very narrow field of view.

 

The Canon 7D gives a much nicer image, and can be operated totally remotely via the computer. Live images are fed to the laptop screen for easy focus and exposure control.

With the still pictures, I want to get to grips with the various image processing techniques for stacking multiple images.

Of course, none of this competes with the Hubble Space Telescope, but amateur astrophotography for me is  more about the satisfaction of seeing what a particular instrument can do, and learning along the way more about the various objects I’m photographing.

After the moon, my next target is Saturn, with the goal of resolving the Cassini division in the rings; and Jupiter, where I’ll be happy if I can resolve the Great Red Spot.

I’m also planning to take some guided wide-field photos of deep sky objects like the Orion Nebula.  But that requires dark skys and the telescope’s drives being sufficiently accurate and strong enough to support a ‘piggy-backed’ camera and lens.  All for another day.

The immediate issue, as the videos show, is just how bad the ‘seeing’ can be when observing at dusk from a building that’s been baking in the sun all day.  I need to find more open skys.

But for now, with the telescope’s motors whirring away on the balcony, I literally am the armchair astrophotographer.

 

Partial View of a Partial Solar Eclipse

Partial Solar Eclipse 4/1/2011. Leicester. This is full res.(click) of (c) below (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse 4/1/2011. Leicester. This is full res.(click) of (c) below (Photo: Tim Jones)

There were literally a few seconds at sunrise this morning when the clouds stayed off long enough for me to catch this partial eclipse of the sun by the moon from a hilltop in Leicester, UK, at around 8.30.

It clouded over completely within ten minutes – and is now snowing.  Fewer clouds would have been nice, but I consider myself lucky all the same.  The limb of the moon is clearly visible.  Following pics in chronological order.

Partial Solar Eclipse (a) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (a) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (b) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (b) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (c) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (c) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (d) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (d) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (e) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (e) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (f) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (f) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (g) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Partial Solar Eclipse (g) 4th Jan 2011, Leicester (Photo: Tim Jones)
Then the clouds close in (Photo:Tim Jones)
Then the clouds close in (Photo:Tim Jones)

SEE ALSO MY POST ON THE 20 May 2012 Annular Solar Eclipse HERE

Leicester University got a similar view: see here.

And some really nice pics from further afield in the Telegraph here.

Mark Edwards, near Rugby, had similar conditions to mine: here via BBC

ISS Pass In Front of Moon

Here’s a nice sequence of exposures showing the International Space Station passing in front of the moon.  As seen from Los Angeles, 21.16 hrs on 23/06/10.

There’s no fixed interval between frames – just as fast as I could click, which is about 1 per second. Canon 30D 100-400 L zoom at 100mm. 0.6 seconds, f 7.1. 800 ASA.

Here’s an enhanced pic, just to bring out the stars in Scorpio, including red supergiant Antares at lower left.  M4 and M80 are invisible in the flare there somewhere.

Moon and ISS in Scorpio
ISS trajectory (credit:Heavens-above.com)